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26/09/2017 22:39

Publication Details

This article is open access.

The impact of the 2008 economic crisis on substance use patterns in the countries of the European Union
Dom G, Samochowiec J, Evans-Lacko S, Wahlbeck K, Van Hal G, McDaid D (2016)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13 1 122
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010122 (available online 13 January 2016)
Abstract: Background: From 2008 on, a severe economic crisis (EC) has characterized the European Union (E.U.). However, changes in substance use behavioral patterns as a result of the economic crisis in Europe, have been poorly reflected upon, and underlying mechanisms remain to be identified; Methods: In this review we explore and systematize the available data on the effect of the 2008 economic crisis on patterns of substance use and related disorders, within the E.U. countries; Results: The results show that effects of the recession need to be differentiated. A number of studies point to reductions in populationís overall substance use. In contrast, an increase in harmful use and negative effects is found within specific subgroups within the society. Risk factors include job-loss and long-term unemployment, and pre-existing vulnerabilities. Finally, our findings point to differences between types of substances in their response on economic crisis periods; Conclusions: the effects of the 2008 economic crisis on substance use patterns within countries of the European Union are two-sided. Next to a reduction in a populationís overall substance use, a number of vulnerable subgroups experience serious negative effects. These groups are in need of specific attention and support, given that there is a real risk that they will continue to suffer negative health effects long after the economic downfall has formally been ended.